Archive for the ‘Hong Kong’ Tag

Developing a shareholder strategy

A survey of shareholder communications in more than 400 companies listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange (HKSE) was published recently by the Hong Kong Institute of Chartered Secretaries (HKICS).   Since the HKSE ranks third equal with the Singapore Stock Exchange in world rankings (behind London and New York), it is likely that the findings have a wider significance.

The report, which I drafted, suggested that effective shareholder communications rest on an understanding of the shareholder base and their information needs. A key conclusion was that whilst some listed companies recognize that shareholder communications are vital, the majority do not and have some way to go to be effective.

Some of the key findings in the study were that:

  • A sizeable proportion of listed companies did not know much about their shareholders – the survey results showed that a third of respondent companies did not know who their shareholders were. They did not regularly or routinely monitor their shareholder base.
  • Some listed companies were not even bothered to find out – 5% of respondents said that they felt that they should be routinely monitoring who their shareholders were but did not: and a further 15.5% said they should be monitoring them on an ad hoc basis but did not.
  • The majority of listed companies lack a shareholder communication strategy

–  58.3% of respondents recognized that their communications with their shareholders were inadequate or ‘somewhat inadequate’.  Most saw the need for improvement.  But 8.6%, although they recognized that their communications were inadequate, saw no need for change. Only 33.1%% thought that their shareholder communications were adequate.

  • The vast majority did not think that all shareholders should be treated equally – Whilst respondents strongly believed that shareholders should be engaged more effectively, only a few (92) felt that all shareholders should be involved, whilst the majority (269) felt that engagement should only be with institutional investors and long-term shareholders. However, respondents believed that these investors had a stewardship role to proactively engage with the company.
  • There is little accountability for shareholder communications at the CEO or board levels – Many companies (172) report information on their shareholder profile to senior management, the board, or board committees. But more companies (241) did not report the data or did not know how it was used.
  • The company secretary is a source of help on investor relations profiling the shareholder base in 52.5% of the companies responding, followed by the Head of Investor Relations (21.0%). Companies reported devoting more resources to investor relations activities including shareholder communication and engagement, with increasing significance for an investor relations function.

Five ‘imperatives’ were developed to give practical and effective guidance to the board of directors and senior management to enhance shareholder communications and investor relations for listed companies, namely to:

  1. Develop an investor relations strategy within the corporate strategy
  2. Know and regularly review the shareholder base
  3. Formulate and regularly review shareholder communication policies
  4. Formulate and regularly review shareholder engagement policies
  5. Review the responsibility and accountability for investor relations

‘The full report can be read at: https://www.hkics.org.hk/index.php?_room=10&_action=detail&_page=3

(Click for the English or Chinese versions)

-Bob Tricker, 2017