Archive for the ‘High Pay Centre’ Tag

New Developments in UK Corporate Governance

New Developments in UK Corporate Governance

In previous blogs, I discussed the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) Green Paper on Corporate Governance Reform issued in November 2016 and the BEIS report which detailed its recommendations and conclusions based on the consultation of this Green Paper.  On 29th August 2017, the UK Government published ‘Corporate Governance Reform, The Government Response to the Green Paper Consultation’, available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/640631/corporate-governance-reform-government-response.pdf

In the Executive Summary, it states that ‘The purpose of corporate governance is to facilitate effective, entrepreneurial and prudent management that can deliver the long-term success of a company. It involves a framework of legislation, codes and voluntary practices.  A key element is protecting the interests of shareholders where they are distant from the directors running a company. It also involves having regard to the interests of employees, customers, suppliers and others with a direct interest in the performance of a company. Good corporate governance provides confidence that a company is being well run and supports better access to external finance and investment.’

The Executive Summary goes on to say that there are nine headline proposals for reform across the three specific aspects of corporate governance on which they consulted, ‘these being executive pay;  strengthening the employee, customer and supplier voice; and corporate governance in large privately-held businesses. It also takes into account the need for effective enforcement of the corporate governance framework.’

Of particular note are that all listed companies will have to reveal the pay ratio between bosses and workers; all listed companies with significant shareholder opposition to executive pay packages will have their names published on a new public register;  and new measures will seek to ensure employee voice is heard in the boardroom.

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/world-leading-package-of-corporate-governance-reforms-announced-to-increase-boardroom-accountability-and-enhance-trust-in-business

 

George Parker highlighted the emphasis on boardroom pay in his article ‘May maintains focus on boardroom pay’ (Financial Times, 26th/27th August 2017, page 2). The High Pay Centre welcomes the requirement for all listed companies to publish their pay ratios ‘Most significant of all, from our point of view, was the announcement that the pay ratio between the CEO and the average UK employee will now have to be published by every listed company. We have never claimed that this measure will solve the problem of excessive pay at the top, nor that it will suddenly halt and reverse a trend that has developed over 20 years and more. Unfair or misleading comparisons between pay ratios in very different businesses or organisations should not be made. But finally we will have a meaningful way of tracking the gap in pay between the top and the average employee. Shareholders and other stakeholders will be able to scrutinise these gaps and apply pressure to close them. And this can be done, of course, not just by restraining pay at the top but raising pay for those lower down the scale.’ (Stefan Stern September Update, High Pay Centre).

The Financial Reporting Council (FRC) will be undertaking a consultation on a fundamental review of the UK Corporate Governance Code later this year as the 25th anniversary of the UK Corporate Governance Code approaches later in 2017.

 

Chris Mallin

September 2017

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UK Corporate Governance Reform 2017

 

BEIS Green Paper on Corporate Governance Reform

In November 2016, the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) issued a Green Paper on Corporate Governance Reform.  The Green Paper states ‘The aim of this Green paper is to consider what changes might be appropriate in the corporate governance regime to help ensure that we have an economy that works for everyone’. It considers three specific areas of corporate governance which might be built on to enhance the UK’s current corporate governance framework.  These areas are:

– executive pay

-strengthening the employee, customer, and supplier voice

– corporate governance in the UK’s largest privately-held businesses.

There are 14 Green Paper questions with six relating to executive pay, three to strengthening the employee, customer and wider stakeholder voice, and five relating to corporate governance in large, privately-held businesses. The consultation closed on 17th February 2017 and responses to the consultation will be made available by BEIS around May 2017.  However, the responses will be made available in collated format and the anonymity of individual responses will be retained.  Nonetheless those who have responded to the consultation are free to publish their own responses or make them more widely available.

Executive remuneration

An interesting article by Aime Williams and Madison Marriage ‘Investors back UK drive to curb executive pay levels’ (Financial Times, 18/19 February 2017, page 17,www.ft.com/Executive_Pay) reports that ‘some of the UK’s largest investors have revealed support for government proposals designed to curb high executive pay in the latest pushback against the widening wealth gap between bosses and workers’. The article cites the views of investors including Old Mutual Global Investors and Fidelity International; also the Pensions and Lifetime Savings Association (PLSA) which has a membership including over 1,300 pension schemes; and the Confederation of British Industry (CBI). The publication of pay ratios received broad support whilst other areas mentioned included more robust consequences for companies whose directors’ remuneration is not approved by shareholders and also implementing an annual binding vote on pay.

Turning now to the High Pay Centre, an independent non-party think tank focused on pay at the top of the income scale. It is interesting to note that the High Pay Centre joined forces with the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) to submit a joint response to the Green paper consultation, marking the commencement of a formal relationship between the two bodies, to ‘advocate fairer and more ethical approaches to pay and reward’. Their recommendations include:

  • All publicly listed companies should be required to publish the ratio between the pay of their CEO and median pay in their organisation.
  • All publicly listed companies should be required to have at least one employee representative on their remuneration committee
  • All publicly listed companies should be required to establish a standalone human capital development sub-committee chaired by the HR director with the same standing as all board sub-committees.
  • The Government should set voluntary human capital (workforce) reporting standards to encourage all publicly listed organisations to provide better information on how they invest in, lead, and manage their workforce for the long-term.

The CIPD/High Pay Centre joint response is available at: http://highpaycentre.org/files/CIPD_and_HPC_response_to_BEIS_Green_Paper_on_Corporate_Governance_%281%29.pdf

Pay ratios

Another High Pay Centre publication which is of particular interest in relation to pay ratios – which seem to be gaining increasing support from various quarters as we have seen earlier – is ‘Pay Ratios: Just Do It’ available at: http://highpaycentre.org/files/Pay_Ratios_-_Just_Do_it.pdf

Going forward

Just a few responses have been mentioned in this blog in relation to executive pay but it seems as though overall the 14 questions posed in the Green Paper will have stimulated wide-ranging debate on key issues which will likely lead to significant reform of the UK’s corporate governance system in the not too distant future.

Chris Mallin

February 2017

Executive Remuneration – Recent Developments

In my June blog piece, I highlighted the fact that executive remuneration remains a ‘hot topic’ in corporate governance. Subsequent to that piece, two interesting reports on executive remuneration were published.

Executive Remuneration Working Group Final Report July 2016

The Executive Remuneration Working Group consists of Nigel Wilson (Chair), Group Chief Executive, Legal & General Group PLC; Russell King, Remuneration Committee Chairman, Aggreko PLC and Spectris PLC; Helena Morrissey, Chief Executive, Newton Investment Management and Chair, The Investment Association; Edmund Truell, Chairman of the Strategic Investment Advisory Board; and David Tyler, Chairman, J Sainsbury PLC and Hammerson PLC.

The Executive Remuneration Working Group has made ten recommendations relating to increasing flexibility (recommendation 1); strengthening remuneration committees and their accountability (recommendations 2, 3, and 4); improving shareholder engagement (recommendations 5 and 6); increasing transparency on target setting and use of discretion (recommendations 7 and 8); and addressing the level of executive pay (recommendations 9 and 10).

The ten recommendations are as follows:

  • Recommendation 1: There should be more flexibility afforded to remuneration committees to choose a remuneration structure which is most appropriate for the company’s strategy and business needs.
  • Recommendation 2: Non-Executive Directors should serve on the remuneration committee for at least a year before taking over the chairmanship of the committee. The Financial Reporting Council (FRC) should consider reflecting this best practice in the UK Corporate Governance Code.
  • Recommendation 3: Boards should ensure the company chairman and whole board are appropriately engaged in the remuneration setting process. This will ensure that the decisions of the remuneration committee are agreed by the board as a whole.
  • Recommendation 4: Remuneration committees need to exercise independent judgement and not be over reliant on their remuneration consultants particularly during engagements with shareholders. To ensure independent advice is maintained, the remuneration committee should regularly put their remuneration advice out to tender.
  • Recommendation 5: Shareholder engagement should focus on the strategic rationale for remuneration structures and involve both investment and governance perspectives. Shareholders should be clear with companies on their views on and level of support for the proposals.
  • Recommendation 6: Companies should focus their engagement on the material issues for consultation. The consultation process should be aimed at understanding investors’ views. Undertaking a process of consultation should not lead to the expectation of investor support.
  • Recommendation 7: Remuneration committees should disclose the process for setting bonus targets and retrospectively disclose the performance range.
  • Recommendation 8: The use of discretion should be clearly disclosed to investors with the remuneration committee articulating the impact the discretion has had on remuneration outcomes. Shareholders will expect committees to take a balanced view on the use of discretion.
  • Recommendation 9: The board should explain why the chosen maximum remuneration level as required under the remuneration policy is appropriate for the company using both external and internal (such as a ratio between the pay of the CEO and median employee) relativities.
  • Recommendation 10: Remuneration committees and consultants should guard against the potential inflationary impact of market data on their remuneration decisions.

The full report is available at: http://www.theinvestmentassociation.org/assets/files/press/2016/ERWG%20Final%20Report%20July%202016.pdf

 

High Pay Centre: The State of Play

The High Pay Centre published its Annual Survey of FTSE100 CEO pay packages in August 2016 and found that there is ‘no end to the rise and rise in top pay’.

FTSE100 CEOs continue to see overall pay packages grow by at least 10% whilst other employees see little or no growth. This exacerbates the gap between the pay of bosses and the pay of workers.

The Survey highlights that in 2015:

  • The average pay for a FTSE100 CEO rose to £5.48 million
  • The average pay ratio between FTSE 100 CEOs and the average wage of their employees was 147:1
  • The median FTSE 100 CEO pay was £3.973 million. This represents a slight increase from £3.873 million in 2014, but up from £3.391 million in 2010.
  • The slower growth in median pay suggests that the increases in average pay are driven by big pay increases for a small number of CEOs at the top.
  • One FTSE 100 company has employee representatives on the board. TUI, which recently merged with German incorporated TUI AG, has an airline pilot and a travel agent on its supervisory board.
  • No FTSE 100 company currently publishes its CEO to employee pay ratio

The report ‘The State of Pay: High Pay Centre briefing on executive pay’ is available at: http://highpaycentre.org/files/The_State_of_Pay_2015.pdf

 

With the UK’s new Prime Minister, Theresa May, having a rather different take to her predecessor on executive remuneration, we can expect to see a shake-up in this area in the future with proposals such as companies having to publish the ratio between the pay of the CEO and the average worker in the business, and that ordinary employees should be involved in discussions over executive pay.

 

Chris Mallin 11th August 2016