Archive for the ‘Green Paper’ Tag

Shareholder Committees

In a previous blog post, I discussed the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) Green Paper on Corporate Governance Reform issued in November 2016.

One of the options suggested in the Green Paper in relation to shareholder engagement on pay, was to ‘Establish a senior “shareholder” committee to engage with executive remuneration arrangements’. According to para 1.36, ‘A complementary or alternative way to enable greater shareholder engagement on pay might be to establish a senior Shareholder Committee to scrutinize remuneration and other key corporate issues such as long term strategy and directors’ appointments. The full implications of adapting any such model in the UK, however, would need careful consideration given its potential impact on our long-established unitary board structure.’

The idea of a shareholder committee received support from some organisations including a joint response to the Green Paper from The UK Shareholders’ Association (UKSA) and the UK Individual Shareholders’ Society (ShareSoc).  Both of these organisations represent the interests of private shareholders who invest directly or indirectly via nominee accounts in public companies or in other forms of equity-based investment.

Their joint response stated ‘We strongly support the concept of Shareholder Committees, provided that they represent the interests of all shareholders, including private investors and investors in employee share plans.’ They are of the view that ‘Shareholder  Committees  are  a  core  part  of  the  solution  to  the  problems  of  corporate  governance. There are many  other elements of governance and control that can be improved and we have commented  in  our  response  on  those  where  we  have  specific  knowledge.  However, without Shareholder  Committees,  and  concomitant  reform  to  restore  the  rights  of  individual  shareholders, other changes to corporate governance are unlikely to produce meaningful change.’

However, certain organisations, for example, Tomorrow’s Company, are wary of widening the scope to include issues such as remuneration.  Tomorrow’s Company’s website states that ‘The original idea proposed by Tomorrow’s Company in 2010 was for a Shareholder Committee which would involve shareholders large (and small) in the most important single governance decision – who represents them on boards. Later variants, like this one and that by Chris Philp MP, have widened the scope to involving investors in discussions about remuneration.’ Tomorrow’s Company then points out that ‘The risk of this more complicated approach is that it compromises the clear leadership responsibility of the board.’

 

Royal Bank of Scotland

A case in point is that of the Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS).  With over 70% ownership by UK taxpayers, there is a very real argument that its governance is of interest to the public more generally.  Aime Williams in her article ‘Shareholders clash with RBS’, (1st April 2017, Financial Times) reports that ‘About 160 individual investors are pushing RBS to form a shareholders’ committee, which would allow retail investors to have a formal say on RBS proposals, such as executive pay, company strategy and director appointments.’

However, RBS’ preference is for a stakeholder committee which would allow a wider stakeholder group to have a voice and air any concerns to directors.  A key difference though, is that a stakeholder panel would have less power and therefore would likely be less effective than a shareholder committee, which would be able to wield more influence.

The RBS Annual General Meeting will be held on 11th May 2017.  It will be interesting to see the outcomes of various resolutions, especially on potentially contentious issues such as executive remuneration, and whether a shareholder committee is established in the future.

 

 

Chris Mallin

April 2017

UK Corporate Governance Reform 2017

 

BEIS Green Paper on Corporate Governance Reform

In November 2016, the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) issued a Green Paper on Corporate Governance Reform.  The Green Paper states ‘The aim of this Green paper is to consider what changes might be appropriate in the corporate governance regime to help ensure that we have an economy that works for everyone’. It considers three specific areas of corporate governance which might be built on to enhance the UK’s current corporate governance framework.  These areas are:

– executive pay

-strengthening the employee, customer, and supplier voice

– corporate governance in the UK’s largest privately-held businesses.

There are 14 Green Paper questions with six relating to executive pay, three to strengthening the employee, customer and wider stakeholder voice, and five relating to corporate governance in large, privately-held businesses. The consultation closed on 17th February 2017 and responses to the consultation will be made available by BEIS around May 2017.  However, the responses will be made available in collated format and the anonymity of individual responses will be retained.  Nonetheless those who have responded to the consultation are free to publish their own responses or make them more widely available.

Executive remuneration

An interesting article by Aime Williams and Madison Marriage ‘Investors back UK drive to curb executive pay levels’ (Financial Times, 18/19 February 2017, page 17,www.ft.com/Executive_Pay) reports that ‘some of the UK’s largest investors have revealed support for government proposals designed to curb high executive pay in the latest pushback against the widening wealth gap between bosses and workers’. The article cites the views of investors including Old Mutual Global Investors and Fidelity International; also the Pensions and Lifetime Savings Association (PLSA) which has a membership including over 1,300 pension schemes; and the Confederation of British Industry (CBI). The publication of pay ratios received broad support whilst other areas mentioned included more robust consequences for companies whose directors’ remuneration is not approved by shareholders and also implementing an annual binding vote on pay.

Turning now to the High Pay Centre, an independent non-party think tank focused on pay at the top of the income scale. It is interesting to note that the High Pay Centre joined forces with the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) to submit a joint response to the Green paper consultation, marking the commencement of a formal relationship between the two bodies, to ‘advocate fairer and more ethical approaches to pay and reward’. Their recommendations include:

  • All publicly listed companies should be required to publish the ratio between the pay of their CEO and median pay in their organisation.
  • All publicly listed companies should be required to have at least one employee representative on their remuneration committee
  • All publicly listed companies should be required to establish a standalone human capital development sub-committee chaired by the HR director with the same standing as all board sub-committees.
  • The Government should set voluntary human capital (workforce) reporting standards to encourage all publicly listed organisations to provide better information on how they invest in, lead, and manage their workforce for the long-term.

The CIPD/High Pay Centre joint response is available at: http://highpaycentre.org/files/CIPD_and_HPC_response_to_BEIS_Green_Paper_on_Corporate_Governance_%281%29.pdf

Pay ratios

Another High Pay Centre publication which is of particular interest in relation to pay ratios – which seem to be gaining increasing support from various quarters as we have seen earlier – is ‘Pay Ratios: Just Do It’ available at: http://highpaycentre.org/files/Pay_Ratios_-_Just_Do_it.pdf

Going forward

Just a few responses have been mentioned in this blog in relation to executive pay but it seems as though overall the 14 questions posed in the Green Paper will have stimulated wide-ranging debate on key issues which will likely lead to significant reform of the UK’s corporate governance system in the not too distant future.

Chris Mallin

February 2017