Archive for September 14th, 2017|Daily archive page

New Developments in UK Corporate Governance

New Developments in UK Corporate Governance

In previous blogs, I discussed the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) Green Paper on Corporate Governance Reform issued in November 2016 and the BEIS report which detailed its recommendations and conclusions based on the consultation of this Green Paper.  On 29th August 2017, the UK Government published ‘Corporate Governance Reform, The Government Response to the Green Paper Consultation’, available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/640631/corporate-governance-reform-government-response.pdf

In the Executive Summary, it states that ‘The purpose of corporate governance is to facilitate effective, entrepreneurial and prudent management that can deliver the long-term success of a company. It involves a framework of legislation, codes and voluntary practices.  A key element is protecting the interests of shareholders where they are distant from the directors running a company. It also involves having regard to the interests of employees, customers, suppliers and others with a direct interest in the performance of a company. Good corporate governance provides confidence that a company is being well run and supports better access to external finance and investment.’

The Executive Summary goes on to say that there are nine headline proposals for reform across the three specific aspects of corporate governance on which they consulted, ‘these being executive pay;  strengthening the employee, customer and supplier voice; and corporate governance in large privately-held businesses. It also takes into account the need for effective enforcement of the corporate governance framework.’

Of particular note are that all listed companies will have to reveal the pay ratio between bosses and workers; all listed companies with significant shareholder opposition to executive pay packages will have their names published on a new public register;  and new measures will seek to ensure employee voice is heard in the boardroom.

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/world-leading-package-of-corporate-governance-reforms-announced-to-increase-boardroom-accountability-and-enhance-trust-in-business

 

George Parker highlighted the emphasis on boardroom pay in his article ‘May maintains focus on boardroom pay’ (Financial Times, 26th/27th August 2017, page 2). The High Pay Centre welcomes the requirement for all listed companies to publish their pay ratios ‘Most significant of all, from our point of view, was the announcement that the pay ratio between the CEO and the average UK employee will now have to be published by every listed company. We have never claimed that this measure will solve the problem of excessive pay at the top, nor that it will suddenly halt and reverse a trend that has developed over 20 years and more. Unfair or misleading comparisons between pay ratios in very different businesses or organisations should not be made. But finally we will have a meaningful way of tracking the gap in pay between the top and the average employee. Shareholders and other stakeholders will be able to scrutinise these gaps and apply pressure to close them. And this can be done, of course, not just by restraining pay at the top but raising pay for those lower down the scale.’ (Stefan Stern September Update, High Pay Centre).

The Financial Reporting Council (FRC) will be undertaking a consultation on a fundamental review of the UK Corporate Governance Code later this year as the 25th anniversary of the UK Corporate Governance Code approaches later in 2017.

 

Chris Mallin

September 2017

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